Thursday, September 24, 2009

4 Books Every Teacher Should Have in Their Classroom

This week I was fortunate to sit in on a presentation by Jacquie McTaggart, "retired" teacher, promoter of books and reading, frequent International Reading Association Speaker, and author of two books: From the Teacher's Desk, and If They Don't Learn the Way You Teach...Teach the Way They Learn. She had great ideas & suggestions for helping reluctant and struggling readers, but not everything was "reading" related; one thing I really appreciated was that she encouraged all the teachers & preservice teachers to do away with the notion of having a captain choose teams. To this day that is one of my worst school memories--always being chosen last, or nearly last, for any kind of sports team.

Another interesting thing I gleaned from her talk was the four books/series she feels every teacher, K-12, should have in their classrooms. In the earlier grades these are books that the more gifted readers will be able to get something out of, and in older grades struggling readers can be successful with them without seeming to be reading kids' books. They are:

* Where's Waldo
* I Spy series
* Guinness Book of World Records
* Ripley's Believe it or Not

Check out http://www.theteachersdesk.com/ for more information from Jacquie McTaggart, or contact me if you're looking for book suggestions for struggling or reluctant readers!

1 comment:

max said...

It's so important to draw attention to reading, and attract reluctant readers to it,especially boys. In fact, I've recently completed a feature magazine article on this subject that comes out in October, "Help for Struggling, Reluctant Readers."

I grew up as a reluctant reader, in spite of the fact that my father published over 70 books. Now I write action-adventures & mysteries, especially for tween boys, that avid boy readers and girls enjoy just as much.

My blog, Books for Boys http://booksandboys.blogspot.com is dedicated to drawing attention to the importance of reading.

Keep up your good work.

Max Elliot Anderson